Oral Advocates at the Wisconsin Supreme Court: An Update for 2020-21 and 2021-22

Two terms have come and gone since our last post on attorneys who deliver frequent oral arguments at the Wisconsin Supreme Court, so today we’ll revisit the topic and see which lawyers have been most active—not only over the past two years but also the two years before that.[Continue Reading…]

Wisconsin Supreme Court Statistics, 1945-46

These tables are derived from information contained in 176 Wisconsin Supreme Court decisions that were turned up in a Nexis Uni search for decisions filed between September 1, 1945, and August 31, 1946.  The total of 176 decisions does not include various orders pertaining to petitions, motions, and the like.  Also omitted is Petition of Doar, a per curiam order setting aside the court’s previous abrogation of a statutory rule.

When two (or more) cases were, in effect, consolidated—one was simply said to be ruled by the decision in the other—the cases are counted as only one:  (1) Langworthy v. Reisinger (249 Wis. 24 and 249 Wis. 29); (2) Estate of Bocher and Dillett v. Rollmann; (3) Gottschalk v. Avalon Realty Co. and Ruppa v. Avalon Realty Co.; (4) State ex rel. Martin v. Barrett, State ex rel. Martin v. Glasser, State ex rel. Martin v. Grossen, State ex rel. Martin v. Gussert, State ex rel. Martin v. Heinz, State ex rel. Martin v. Lochman, State ex rel. Martin v. Nickolai, State ex rel. Martin v. Seroogy, and State ex rel. Martin v. Willard

Eight justices appear in a number of the tables because Justice Joseph Martin died in March 1946 and was replaced the following month by Justice Ward Rector.

The tables are available as a complete set and by individual topic in the subsets listed below.

Four-to-Three Decisions
Decisions Arranged by Vote Split
Frequency of Justices in the Majority
Distribution of Opinion Authorship
Frequency of Agreement Between Pairs of Justices

“Women and the Wisconsin Supreme Court”: An Update through 2021-22

Three years have passed since the previous post in this series, and it’s time for another look at the frequency with which women have been delivering oral arguments at the supreme court. … [Continue reading]

Wisconsin Supreme Court Statistics, 1946-47

These tables are derived from information contained in 190 Wisconsin Supreme Court decisions that were turned up in a Nexis Uni search for decisions filed between September 1, 1946, and August 31, 1947.  The total of 190 decisions does not include … [Continue reading]

The Fate of Petitions for Review in Criminal Cases, 2014-15 and 2020-21

Recent data on petitions for review allow us to compare petitions submitted during the 2020-21 term with those featured in a post six years ago.[1]  The previous post, which covered petitions in 2014-15, addressed criminal cases, and we will maintain … [Continue reading]

The 2021-22 Fantasy League Medalists

This season the Competition Committee sought to provide stiffer opposition for the Gavels, perennial champions from the State Public Defender’s Office, by disbanding one of the other teams and distributing its members among the other three … [Continue reading]

Reversing the Court of Appeals, 2020-21 and 2021-22

A reader, who prefers anonymity, inquired recently about reversal rates for court of appeals judges.  His interest extended beyond summary figures from the four court of appeals districts, he explained, for he was curious to learn how frequently the … [Continue reading]

Wisconsin Supreme Court Statistics, 2021-22

These tables are derived from information contained in 52 Wisconsin Supreme Court decisions filed between September 1, 2021, and the end of the court’s term in the summer of 2022.  The total of 52 decisions omits orders pertaining to various motions, … [Continue reading]

The 2021-22 Term: Some More Impressions

Today we’ll continue our assessment of the 2021-22 term with summaries of the outcomes in four areas of interest: (1) the length of decisions; (2) the number of concurrences and dissents; (3) the number of days between oral argument and decision … [Continue reading]

Are the Justices “liberals” and “conservatives”?

Yesterday’s post prompted an eminent Wisconsin attorney to contact me with an objection to the use of the terms “liberal” and “conservative” to characterize justices on the Wisconsin Supreme Court.  Here are the portions of his argument that I can … [Continue reading]