How Many Decisions Can We Expect in 2021-22?

With the arrival of spring, it’s time for SCOWstat’s annual estimate of the number of decisions that the court will have filed once the books close in late July.  Information now in hand should allow us to predict the actual total almost exactly.[Continue Reading…]

Law Firm Fantasy League

The Gavels of the State Public Defender’s Office collected seven points this week (for a brief, oral argument, and partially favorable outcome in State v. Joseph G. Green), moving them just two points behind the third-place Affirmed.

Click here for the complete, updated standings.

Wisconsin Supreme Court Statistics, 1948-49

These tables are derived from information contained in 221 Wisconsin Supreme Court decisions that were turned up in a Nexis Uni search for decisions filed between September 1, 1948, and August 31, 1949.  The total of 221 decisions does not include various orders pertaining to petitions, motions, applications, and disciplinary matters involving lawyers and judges. 

Also excluded are Carley v. Jewett and Halvorson v. Connors because the justices split 3-3 in these two cases. 

In Ainsworth v. Berg the court found its original mandate (November 16, 1948) to be erroneous and issued a new full-length decision (February 15, 1949).  Both decisions are counted here.

After deciding In re Szperka’s Will, the justices granted a motion for rehearing and revoked their previous mandate, replacing it with a one-sentence ruling.  I have counted this case only once, though one could argue that it should be counted twice.

Kaestner v. Milwaukee Auto. Ins. Co. (254 Wis. 12); Robson v. Milwaukee Auto. Ins. Co. (254 Wis. 18); and Kaestner v. Milwaukee Auto. Ins. Co. (254 Wis. 17) were, in effect, consolidated—the latter two said to be ruled by the decision in the first.  Thus, I have counted the trio as a single case.

Justice Grover Broadfoot began serving in mid-November 1948.  His predecessor, Justice Elmer Barlow, died in June 1948.  This left the court with only six justices for cases decided from September until after Justice Broadfoot’s arrival.  He is listed as a participant in decisions beginning with those filed on December 15, 1948.

The tables are available as a complete set and by individual topic in the subsets listed below.

Four-to-Three Decisions
Decisions Arranged by Vote Split
Frequency of Justices in the Majority
Distribution of Opinion Authorship
Frequency of Agreement Between Pairs of Justices

Law Firm Fantasy League

This week’s lone decision did not yield points for any of the teams–hence, no change in the standings.

Law Firm Fantasy League

No decisions were filed this week–hence, no change in the standings.

An Update on Fourth-Amendment Cases: 2019-20 and 2020-21

With two terms completed since our last update, it’s time for another look at how the justices are handling Fourth-Amendment cases—more specifically, how many of these cases they are accepting; how sympathetically they are reacting to Fourth-Amendment arguments; and how they compare to their predecessors on the bench. [Continue Reading…]

Law Firm Fantasy League

This week’s decision delivered a point to the Gavels of the State Public Defender’s Office for an amicus brief in State v. Teresa L. Clark.

Click here for the updated standings.

Law Firm Fantasy League

As detailed below, this week’s decisions showered points on three of the league’s teams, moving all of them well above the fourth-place Gavels.  Click here for the updated standings.

The Writs: 15 points.
Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty, 10 points for a brief, oral argument, and favorable outcome in Billie Johnson v. Wisconsin Elections Commission.

Pines Bach, five points for a brief and oral argument in Billie Johnson v. Wisconsin Elections Commission.

The Waivers: 13 points.
Troutman Pepper, 10 points for a brief, oral argument, and favorable outcome in Billie Johnson v. Wisconsin Elections Commission.

Boardman & Clark, three points for a brief in Billie Johnson v. Wisconsin Elections Commission.

The Affirmed: 11 points.
Stafford Rosenbaum, five points for a brief and oral argument in Billie Johnson v. Wisconsin Elections Commission and one point for an amicus brief in James Sewell v. Racine Unified School District Board of Canvassers.

O’Neil, Cannon, Hollman, DeJong & Laing, five points for a brief and oral argument in Nudo Holdings, LLC v. Board of Review for the City of Kenosha.

 

Wisconsin Supreme Court Statistics, 1949-50

These tables are derived from information contained in 208 Wisconsin Supreme Court decisions that were turned up in a Nexis Uni search for decisions filed between September 1, 1949, and August 31, 1950.  The total of 208 decisions does not include various orders pertaining to petitions, motions, applications, and the like (generally disposed of without oral argument and in short per curiam decisions). 

One could argue that the order in Application of Alloway (granting a writ sought by the petitioner) should be included, because it bears some of the features of a regular decision.  However, the fact that the order appeared just one day after the hearing suffices to distinguish the case from those under consideration here.

In Wyman v. Utech the court found its original mandate (December 30, 1949, authored by Justice Rosenberry) to be erroneous and issued a new decision (May 2, 1950, authored by Justice Gehl).  Both decisions are counted here. 

Eight justices appear in a number of the tables because Justice Marvin Rosenberry retired in January 1950 and was replaced that month by Edward Gehl.

The tables are available as a complete set and by individual topic in the subsets listed below.

Four-to-Three Decisions
Decisions Arranged by Vote Split
Frequency of Justices in the Majority
Distribution of Opinion Authorship
Frequency of Agreement Between Pairs of Justices
Average Time Between Oral Argument and Opinions Authored by Each Justice

Law Firm Fantasy League

No decisions were filed this week–hence, no change in the standings.